Dyeing


Four shades from one batch of Bog Myrtle. The Hebridean Woolshed, Isle of South Uist
Bog Myrtle (or if you prefer, Sweet Gale) is a shrubby plant that found its place in the human economy in ancient times, along with the likes of the olive and other oil-rich herbs used in food, drink or medicines.

Sweet Gale – Bog Myrtle


Jonathan's hands and arms stained from handling New Zealand Flax flower stems. The Hebridean Woolshed, Isle of South Uist
After an afternoon tidying up the flailing flower stems of New Zealand Flax, J's hands and arms were stained golden brown. And that got us thinking ...

Golden Brown




Sunshine under Gray Clouds: Just out of the dyehouse: Cheviot wool dyed with golden rod flowers over alum mordant, The Hebridean Woolshed, Isle of South Uist
Sunshine under Gray Clouds: Just out of the dyehouse: Cheviot wool dyed with ragwort flowers over alum mordant, The Hebridean Woolshed, Isle of South Uist

Sunshine under Gray Clouds


Plant-dyed Cheviot wool, Hebridean Woolshed, Isle of South Uist
Joys of Spring: A pile of plant-dyed Cheviot wool yarn by Denise Bridge, Hebridean Woolshed, Isle of South Uist

Joys of Spring!




Logwood, Hebridean Woolshed, South Uist
Jonathan: Recently Denise was contacted by someone wanting to knit a scarf with natural-dyed wool, sending her a swatch of upholstery fabric as a guide to colours. (I don’t know if there’s a physchological disorder in which a person is obsessed with co-ordinating colours, but if there is I feel […]

Swatch Match


Natural-dyed Cheviot wool from the Hebridean Woolshed to the Glasgow School of Art
Denise: Just look at this lovely bundle of sunshine and joy! They’re off to the Glasgow School of Art – their second order in just a few days – and looking forward with excitement to a new life in frame-weaving work.  Lucky them!

Gone to Glasgow